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Old Testament

Jonah: The Prodigal’s Elder Brother

Jonah preaching to the Ninevites, by Gustave Doré.
Jonah preaching to the Ninevites, by Gustave Doré.

It will help at the outset for me to affirm that the world of the Bible is the real world, where God is free to act within and to interact with His creation. Herein donkeys talk, axe heads float, people are raised from the dead, and fish swallow people.

When most people think of the Book of Jonah, they think of Jonah being swallowed by the “whale.” And yet, the great fish only occupies about 11 verses in the entire account. Thankfully, the Book of Jonah has a more poignantly theological focus than merely chronicling a fish swallowing a man. In reality, the story is not even about Jonah. God is the main character in the book of Jonah, and the real story is about His compassion on a reluctant prophet and a city full of heathens. The Book of Jonah shows Israel that salvation is not only for them.

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The Tower of Babel

The Tower of Babel, by Pieter Bruegel
The Tower of Babel, by Pieter Bruegel

11:1-2 – Now the whole earth had one language and one speech. And it came to pass, as they journeyed from the east, that they found a plain in the land of Shinar, and they dwelt there.

The Great Flood had destroyed all life on Earth except for Noah and his family, who were then tasked with multiplying and filling the earth. Naturally, all of Noah’s descendants would speak the same language. Moses does not present this as a bad development, but rather in a matter-of-fact statement. It was not mankind’s common language, but rather the attitude and ambition of mankind that would cause God to see their single language as a liability. The passage implies mankind’s common unity of purpose. God saw that not only were humans speaking the same language, they were of the same mind, too. In verse 2, we see that humans had not fully obeyed God’s command to Noah and his sons: “Be fruitful and multiply, and fill the earth” (Gen. 9:1). Obedience to this command was obviously important to God because he had commanded Adam and Eve to do the same in Genesis: “Be fruitful and multiply; fill the earth and subdue it” (Gen. 1:28). But mankind tends to embrace stasis rather than change, so the postdiluvian humans decided to band together rather than disperse and fill the earth as God had commanded.

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Denial of Inerrancy Is An Ancient Error

adam-eve-temptationAfter creating a beautiful paradise for Adam, God encouraged him to enjoy all of its bounty, except for that of one tree: “Of every tree of the garden you may freely eat; but of the tree of the knowledge of good and evil you shall not eat, for in the day that you eat of it you shall surely die.”1 But because of mankind’s propensity to idolize self, this idyllic Eden was not to last.

Self-idolatry, however, is not limited to mankind. Isaiah recounts the story of Satan’s fall from Heaven, writing that Lucifer’s damning sin was his desire to exalt himself to equality with God: “I will ascend into Heaven, I will exalt my throne above the stars of God…I will ascend above the heights of the clouds; I will be like the Most High.”2 In this account, we see that Satan’s own weakness is how he tempted mankind. Satan wanted equality with God, and that’s exactly how he enticed Adam and Eve. History inevitably repeats itself when the creature rebels against the Creator. In other words, error loves company.

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Theology and Ethics